Years later, the Yezidis became "strangers" in their country

2021/12/8574-1640070649.jpg
Read: 1235     15:30     21 Декабрь 2021    

More than 200,000 displaced Iraqis live in refugee camps, including Yazidi refugees.
Iraqi Yezidis also annually celebrate the holiday of Aida Ezid with all other Yezidis from all over the world. Aida Ezid is a celebration of the creation of the world, which is celebrated by Yazidis in winter, in the second half of December, on the second or third Friday after three days of fasting, but in recent years such events have become overshadowed since a large number of Iraqi Yazidis are in camps for displaced persons.
A report by The Conversation magazine shows how much the celebration of "Aida Ezid" has changed since the ISIS terrorists expelled thousands of Yezidis from their towns, villages, and homes.
More than 200,000 displaced Iraqis live in refugee camps, and the fate of about 3,000 Yazidi women and children has remained unknown since they were abducted by ISIS in 2014.
Websites on the Internet indicate that the history of the ancient Yezidi people in northern Iraq is full of oppression and violence, because for six centuries the Yezidi people have been persecuted by Islamic radicals and various regimes that ruled the country.
Since 2014, with the seizure of the Yezidi lands by terrorists, everything has become even more difficult, the Yezidis have left their places of ancestral residence and were resettled in the camps of Iraqi Kurdistan. In the camps, internally displaced persons are struggling for water and electricity, and health care is not available at all due to high financial costs.
The agreement signed between the Federal Government of Iraq and the Government of Kurdistan on restoring stability in the Sinjar region has not yet been implemented, this agreement would give the Yazidis an opportunity to return to their lands.
Yazidi refugees have two options: to continue living in camps, despite the difficult living conditions, or to return to their areas of residence, despite the risks of political and military violence.
The city of Sinjar is the main stronghold of the Yazidis in Iraq, but on June 10, 2014, this city with a population of about 300,000 people fell to the terrorist group ISIS.
The Yezidis are a warlike people who have not been broken, the enemies have not been able to conquer and exterminate them, for centuries the Yezidis have been fighting ill-wishers to the last drop of blood, their spirit is not broken and hope for life and freedom burns in their eyes.
Since the local Yezidi population did not have weapons for self-defense, most of the population died, and hundreds of women and children were captured and enslaved by ISIS terrorists, although some still managed to escape.
It is noteworthy that the Yezidi people, who are a minority, live in areas in northern Iraq and Syria and profess the monotheistic Sharfadin religion, believe in a single God (Hoda) and seven angels led by the Peacock angel (Malak Taus). For centuries, Yezidis have been persecuted by extremists because of their beliefs and religion.

Mraze Roni





Tags: #yazidisinfo   #newsyazidis   #aboutyazidis   #genocideyazidis  



Years later, the Yezidis became "strangers" in their country

2021/12/8574-1640070649.jpg
Read: 1236     15:30     21 Декабрь 2021    

More than 200,000 displaced Iraqis live in refugee camps, including Yazidi refugees.
Iraqi Yezidis also annually celebrate the holiday of Aida Ezid with all other Yezidis from all over the world. Aida Ezid is a celebration of the creation of the world, which is celebrated by Yazidis in winter, in the second half of December, on the second or third Friday after three days of fasting, but in recent years such events have become overshadowed since a large number of Iraqi Yazidis are in camps for displaced persons.
A report by The Conversation magazine shows how much the celebration of "Aida Ezid" has changed since the ISIS terrorists expelled thousands of Yezidis from their towns, villages, and homes.
More than 200,000 displaced Iraqis live in refugee camps, and the fate of about 3,000 Yazidi women and children has remained unknown since they were abducted by ISIS in 2014.
Websites on the Internet indicate that the history of the ancient Yezidi people in northern Iraq is full of oppression and violence, because for six centuries the Yezidi people have been persecuted by Islamic radicals and various regimes that ruled the country.
Since 2014, with the seizure of the Yezidi lands by terrorists, everything has become even more difficult, the Yezidis have left their places of ancestral residence and were resettled in the camps of Iraqi Kurdistan. In the camps, internally displaced persons are struggling for water and electricity, and health care is not available at all due to high financial costs.
The agreement signed between the Federal Government of Iraq and the Government of Kurdistan on restoring stability in the Sinjar region has not yet been implemented, this agreement would give the Yazidis an opportunity to return to their lands.
Yazidi refugees have two options: to continue living in camps, despite the difficult living conditions, or to return to their areas of residence, despite the risks of political and military violence.
The city of Sinjar is the main stronghold of the Yazidis in Iraq, but on June 10, 2014, this city with a population of about 300,000 people fell to the terrorist group ISIS.
The Yezidis are a warlike people who have not been broken, the enemies have not been able to conquer and exterminate them, for centuries the Yezidis have been fighting ill-wishers to the last drop of blood, their spirit is not broken and hope for life and freedom burns in their eyes.
Since the local Yezidi population did not have weapons for self-defense, most of the population died, and hundreds of women and children were captured and enslaved by ISIS terrorists, although some still managed to escape.
It is noteworthy that the Yezidi people, who are a minority, live in areas in northern Iraq and Syria and profess the monotheistic Sharfadin religion, believe in a single God (Hoda) and seven angels led by the Peacock angel (Malak Taus). For centuries, Yezidis have been persecuted by extremists because of their beliefs and religion.

Mraze Roni





Tags: #yazidisinfo   #newsyazidis   #aboutyazidis   #genocideyazidis