Perhaps the ancient city discovered in Iraq belonged to the Yezidis

2023/05/54544-1683704393.jpg
Read: 2470     12:30     10 Май 2023    

The archaeological hill located in the western part of Habur Triangle, 35 km north of Al Hasakah, has an elliptical shape with a diameter of 600 m. It is about 28 ha. The hill is ideally located at the intersection of the two main roads leading from Tigris to Euphrates and north to south leading from Diyarbakır to Altynova district.

The hill is surrounded by a wall about 2km long and pierced by seven gates leading to the main cities in the upper Syrian, especially Nagar (Tell Brak), Orkesh (Tell Mosan) and Shkhnah. - Shubat Enlil (Tell Leylan), Tell Huwayrah and Mari (Tell Hariri), and Tarka (Tell Al-Hariri). These seven gates indicate the strategic importance of trade movement in the third millennium BC. The height of the hill is 28 meters and on the top of the hill is the Acropolis, which is 60 meters in diameter and 7.5 meters high.

The history of the hill dates back to the third millennium BC and it was partially repopulated during the Hellenistic era.

It went through a series of stages (Assyrian, Midian, Mitanni and Hellenistic periods) but was most important and prosperous in the middle of the third millennium BC when a kingdom called Nabada was formed, located inside a fortified city with external and internal walls and gates, containing palaces and temples and controlling all the rural areas surrounding the site.

Excavations on the hill began in 1993 and have unearthed important archaeological finds in various sectors.

Sector F, for example, includes a royal palace built at the dawn of the Third Dynasty between 2500 and 2400 BC. Its dimensions are 32 m by 21 m. It was rebuilt in stages and probably had two floors. The palace was built according to a preliminary design, in a style known in Mesopotamia.

The middle wing comprises the entrance on the east side and leads to the hall, then to the reception and throne room; it has square columns and a façade with a characteristic architectural style, niches and jambs; as for the left and right wings, they deal with administrative and service affairs. This structure also includes a rectangular temple similar to the one found in Mari.

Sector E includes an important building that may have been a temple or granary (dating to the dawn of the early dynasties around 2400-2500 BC), rectangular in shape, 26 meters long and 7.5 meters wide, situated parallel to the eastern road leading to the high city. The building still retains high walls over three meters high from the third millennium BC.

It was divided into four consecutive rooms, rectangular and parallel basins separated from each other by arched walls (vaults). The entrance to the building is in the middle of the west side and is located in one straight line with the east facade.

In sector B the administrative buildings belonging to the palace were discovered in which the oldest cuneiform texts of Syrian Jazirah were found, where the number of cuneiform figures found in these buildings reached 165.

The finds show that the city flourished and was independent around 2500 BC, and its population at that time can be estimated at 2000-3000 people. Then it was subjected to Akkadian power, and this was the beginning of its decline and the rapid decline of its star.

The Department of Antiquities and Museums of Al-Hasakah governorate began various restoration works on the archaeological site of Tell Baidar.

The restoration work includes an architectural block consisting of four temples and a palace dating from the middle of the third millennium BC, and the treatment of voids and cracks in the modern walls covering the ancient blocks, in replenishment and restoration of the site.

The ancient name of the archaeological site:

The texts do not explicitly refer to the old name of the city, as other groups of texts do, and they include references to the names of 45 places, one of which is presumably the old name of the city.

It is noteworthy that Al-Hasakah governorate is considered one of the richest archaeological areas in Syria and includes about 800 archaeological sites registered with the Department of Antiquities and Museums and 146 unregistered sites.





Tags: #yazidisinfo   #newsyazidis  



Perhaps the ancient city discovered in Iraq belonged to the Yezidis

2023/05/54544-1683704393.jpg
Read: 2471     12:30     10 Май 2023    

The archaeological hill located in the western part of Habur Triangle, 35 km north of Al Hasakah, has an elliptical shape with a diameter of 600 m. It is about 28 ha. The hill is ideally located at the intersection of the two main roads leading from Tigris to Euphrates and north to south leading from Diyarbakır to Altynova district.

The hill is surrounded by a wall about 2km long and pierced by seven gates leading to the main cities in the upper Syrian, especially Nagar (Tell Brak), Orkesh (Tell Mosan) and Shkhnah. - Shubat Enlil (Tell Leylan), Tell Huwayrah and Mari (Tell Hariri), and Tarka (Tell Al-Hariri). These seven gates indicate the strategic importance of trade movement in the third millennium BC. The height of the hill is 28 meters and on the top of the hill is the Acropolis, which is 60 meters in diameter and 7.5 meters high.

The history of the hill dates back to the third millennium BC and it was partially repopulated during the Hellenistic era.

It went through a series of stages (Assyrian, Midian, Mitanni and Hellenistic periods) but was most important and prosperous in the middle of the third millennium BC when a kingdom called Nabada was formed, located inside a fortified city with external and internal walls and gates, containing palaces and temples and controlling all the rural areas surrounding the site.

Excavations on the hill began in 1993 and have unearthed important archaeological finds in various sectors.

Sector F, for example, includes a royal palace built at the dawn of the Third Dynasty between 2500 and 2400 BC. Its dimensions are 32 m by 21 m. It was rebuilt in stages and probably had two floors. The palace was built according to a preliminary design, in a style known in Mesopotamia.

The middle wing comprises the entrance on the east side and leads to the hall, then to the reception and throne room; it has square columns and a façade with a characteristic architectural style, niches and jambs; as for the left and right wings, they deal with administrative and service affairs. This structure also includes a rectangular temple similar to the one found in Mari.

Sector E includes an important building that may have been a temple or granary (dating to the dawn of the early dynasties around 2400-2500 BC), rectangular in shape, 26 meters long and 7.5 meters wide, situated parallel to the eastern road leading to the high city. The building still retains high walls over three meters high from the third millennium BC.

It was divided into four consecutive rooms, rectangular and parallel basins separated from each other by arched walls (vaults). The entrance to the building is in the middle of the west side and is located in one straight line with the east facade.

In sector B the administrative buildings belonging to the palace were discovered in which the oldest cuneiform texts of Syrian Jazirah were found, where the number of cuneiform figures found in these buildings reached 165.

The finds show that the city flourished and was independent around 2500 BC, and its population at that time can be estimated at 2000-3000 people. Then it was subjected to Akkadian power, and this was the beginning of its decline and the rapid decline of its star.

The Department of Antiquities and Museums of Al-Hasakah governorate began various restoration works on the archaeological site of Tell Baidar.

The restoration work includes an architectural block consisting of four temples and a palace dating from the middle of the third millennium BC, and the treatment of voids and cracks in the modern walls covering the ancient blocks, in replenishment and restoration of the site.

The ancient name of the archaeological site:

The texts do not explicitly refer to the old name of the city, as other groups of texts do, and they include references to the names of 45 places, one of which is presumably the old name of the city.

It is noteworthy that Al-Hasakah governorate is considered one of the richest archaeological areas in Syria and includes about 800 archaeological sites registered with the Department of Antiquities and Museums and 146 unregistered sites.





Tags: #yazidisinfo   #newsyazidis