Article in the "National Interest" titled " Eight Years After Genocide, the World Owes the Yezidis a Debt"

2022/08/01-1659766600.jpg
Read: 802     12:00     06 Август 2022    

The crime against Iraqi Yazidis was one of the most heinous crimes of the 21st century.

An article in the National Interest titled "Eight Years After Genocide, the World Owes the Yezidis a Debt," written by Pari Ibrahim, founder of the Free Yezidis Association and Meghan Bodette, head of research at the Kurdish Peace Institute, notes that the Yezidi community has looked forward to peace and justice after the defeat of terrorists. This includes the return of women and children abducted in 2014, the restoration of Sinjar, a Yazidi stronghold, returning displaced people to their homes and bring to justice ISIS terrorists. However, these "basic goals" were not achieved.

An article published in the magazine states, "Yet nearly a decade after the genocide began and more than three years after ISIS lost its so-called caliphate, these basic goals have not been realized. The very same governments that claimed “never again,” recognized ISIS crimes as genocide, and offer rhetoric in support of the Yezidi people are partially to blame".

The magazine states that the political response to the crime has largely failed because they have not recognized or addressed the structural factors and root causes of ISIS atrocities.

Pari argues that history has shown time and time again that genocide never begins with mass murder, but rather that such violence is always a process preceded by marginalization, persecution and dehumanization. For the Yazidis, marginalization, persecution and dehumanization began in their ancestral homeland in the Middle East long before 2014. They were never equal citizens of the countries in which they lived, their Yezidi identity was not recognized and their neighbors treated them with suspicion and contempt.

The magazine states that "Even today, many refuse to buy food made by Yezidis, believing it to be unclean". As many as 300000 Yazidis were exterminated hundreds of years ago. Hundreds of years ago, up to 300000 Yezidis were exterminated. Just seven years before ISIS attacked Sinjar, extremist bombings in the area killed about 800 people and injured more than 1500.

Sinjar Agreement

The author of the article criticized the agreement, which was made to promote peace and stability in Sinjar after ISIS and says that "Yet nearly two years after the agreement was made, it appears to have increased, not reduced, instability. This is a direct result of the fact that the agreement prioritizes the interests of the governments in Baghdad and Erbil that have failed to protect and represent their Yezidi constituents—and left Yezidi civil society out of the agreement negotiations".

The article also points out that the issue is the lack of outrage in response to the repeated terrorist strikes that have been killing Yezidi genocide survivors in Sinjar for years and preventing displaced Yezidis from returning home.

The writer adds that "If Iraqi authorities and the international community truly valued Yezidis and other ethnic or religious minorities, they would have pushed back against terrorist aggression long ago".

NECESSARY STEPS

The article says that there should be targeted international efforts to put an end to all internal and external attacks on Sinjar.

An important step is the closure of the airspace of this area to foreign aircraft, with the exception of counter-ISIS operations.

This can and should extend to attempts to completely exclude foreign conflicts from Iraq, and all participants who want to use Iraq as a battlefield should be pushed towards the peaceful resolution of disputes, and there is no doubt that the diplomatic efforts that will be required to encourage such changes and in the long run no more costly, than the continuing effects of conflict and foreign interference in Iraq on Yazidis and other vulnerable communities.

The writer says that the Sinjar agreement should also be reviewed under neutral international mediation and with Yazidis of all political views and the new agreement should not serve foreign policy purposes and should not include allowing targeted military action against Yazidis or the expulsion of any Iraqi Yazidis.

Mlêtê Êzidî

 





Tags: #ezidi   #sindjar   #shangal   #ezidxan   #yezidis   #yazidis   #genocidezides  



Article in the "National Interest" titled " Eight Years After Genocide, the World Owes the Yezidis a Debt"

2022/08/01-1659766600.jpg
Read: 803     12:00     06 Август 2022    

The crime against Iraqi Yazidis was one of the most heinous crimes of the 21st century.

An article in the National Interest titled "Eight Years After Genocide, the World Owes the Yezidis a Debt," written by Pari Ibrahim, founder of the Free Yezidis Association and Meghan Bodette, head of research at the Kurdish Peace Institute, notes that the Yezidi community has looked forward to peace and justice after the defeat of terrorists. This includes the return of women and children abducted in 2014, the restoration of Sinjar, a Yazidi stronghold, returning displaced people to their homes and bring to justice ISIS terrorists. However, these "basic goals" were not achieved.

An article published in the magazine states, "Yet nearly a decade after the genocide began and more than three years after ISIS lost its so-called caliphate, these basic goals have not been realized. The very same governments that claimed “never again,” recognized ISIS crimes as genocide, and offer rhetoric in support of the Yezidi people are partially to blame".

The magazine states that the political response to the crime has largely failed because they have not recognized or addressed the structural factors and root causes of ISIS atrocities.

Pari argues that history has shown time and time again that genocide never begins with mass murder, but rather that such violence is always a process preceded by marginalization, persecution and dehumanization. For the Yazidis, marginalization, persecution and dehumanization began in their ancestral homeland in the Middle East long before 2014. They were never equal citizens of the countries in which they lived, their Yezidi identity was not recognized and their neighbors treated them with suspicion and contempt.

The magazine states that "Even today, many refuse to buy food made by Yezidis, believing it to be unclean". As many as 300000 Yazidis were exterminated hundreds of years ago. Hundreds of years ago, up to 300000 Yezidis were exterminated. Just seven years before ISIS attacked Sinjar, extremist bombings in the area killed about 800 people and injured more than 1500.

Sinjar Agreement

The author of the article criticized the agreement, which was made to promote peace and stability in Sinjar after ISIS and says that "Yet nearly two years after the agreement was made, it appears to have increased, not reduced, instability. This is a direct result of the fact that the agreement prioritizes the interests of the governments in Baghdad and Erbil that have failed to protect and represent their Yezidi constituents—and left Yezidi civil society out of the agreement negotiations".

The article also points out that the issue is the lack of outrage in response to the repeated terrorist strikes that have been killing Yezidi genocide survivors in Sinjar for years and preventing displaced Yezidis from returning home.

The writer adds that "If Iraqi authorities and the international community truly valued Yezidis and other ethnic or religious minorities, they would have pushed back against terrorist aggression long ago".

NECESSARY STEPS

The article says that there should be targeted international efforts to put an end to all internal and external attacks on Sinjar.

An important step is the closure of the airspace of this area to foreign aircraft, with the exception of counter-ISIS operations.

This can and should extend to attempts to completely exclude foreign conflicts from Iraq, and all participants who want to use Iraq as a battlefield should be pushed towards the peaceful resolution of disputes, and there is no doubt that the diplomatic efforts that will be required to encourage such changes and in the long run no more costly, than the continuing effects of conflict and foreign interference in Iraq on Yazidis and other vulnerable communities.

The writer says that the Sinjar agreement should also be reviewed under neutral international mediation and with Yazidis of all political views and the new agreement should not serve foreign policy purposes and should not include allowing targeted military action against Yazidis or the expulsion of any Iraqi Yazidis.

Mlêtê Êzidî

 





Tags: #ezidi   #sindjar   #shangal   #ezidxan   #yezidis   #yazidis   #genocidezides