The Murad Code - as a panacea for informational and humanitarian ignorance

2022/05/7777-1652859357.jpg
Read: 412     12:30     18 Май 2022    

Foreword

It is a voluntary Code of Conduct that sets out the existing minimum standards for the safe, effective and ethical collection and use of information about victims or victims of systematic and conflict-related sexual violence. It concerns those who document, investigate, report, investigate, monitor, and otherwise collect and use such information.
The Code is based on international law, including the basic rights of survivors, such as the right to dignity, privacy, health, safety, access to justice, truth, and effective remedies. Thus, the Code reflects universal, non-negotiable core standards that should be applied by all participants in all contexts to support a victim-centered approach. The Code embodies standards applicable to individuals and organizations that must implement these standards into systems.
The "Murad Code" should be applied, for example, by human rights investigators, documentaries, observers and activists, criminal investigators; other officials and experts who collect, request, or receive SCRSV information, including immigration officers, as well as forensic experts; journalists; researchers; translators; and There are also public support organizations, survivor groups and humanitarian workers who collect, distribute, or publish such information. It should also be applied by those who appoint, manage, finance, and otherwise support or facilitate such collection and use of information, including policy makers.
The current focus of the Code on SCRSV stems from the origins of the initiative to identify and refine SCRSV standards and some factors specific to sexual violence, such as societal attitudes and stigmatization, which further harm survivors of violence. However, many of the Code's standards are equally applicable to the collection and use of information from survivors of other crimes and human rights violations.
We also need to consider in our work a wide range of other survivors, such as people with disabilities, persons from LGBT+ communities.
The Code emphasizes the need to recognize the identity of survivors and avoid assumptions based on the groups to which they belong or on any aspect of their personality. For example, "children" are not a homogeneous group and include people who are very different in age, maturity, resilience, education, gender, other identities, and situations.

Principle 1. Understand survivors as individuals

1.1 Adapt to survivor’s individuality: We respect that each survivor is unique. We will tailor our approach to their specific identities, characteristics, groups, and contexts, such as their age, gender, evolving capacities, resilience, relationships with and connections to others, socio-economic and political situation, and the discrimination they face. We recognize that such elements change over time and context and that our approach may have to be adjusted accordingly.
1.2 Counter assumptions: We will not make assumptions or generalizations about survivors or their experiences, such as how they ‘should’ behave or react, their vulnerability, trauma, resilience, gender, disabilities, capacity, maturity, reliability, needs or concerns.
1.3 Ask the survivor: Following initial preparation work, we will ask the survivor, including child survivors, about what they want, their priorities, concerns, risks and current situation. We will respect and reflect these to the extent possible within our mandates and resources.
1.4 Prioritise survivor safety: We will continuously prioritise a survivor’s safety, well-being and dignity ahead of our objectives. We will work to understand the risks and repercussions to survivors and those around them which could arise from any contact with us. Such risks can include revictimisation, reprisals, stigmatisation, physical, online, information and communications safety risks, and legal risks.
1.5 Identify heightened risks: We will take additional, specific precautions when there are heightened risks of further harm. We recognise that any individual may face heightened risks which may change over time and context. Heightened risks may arise for child survivors including children born of war and unaccompanied children, persons from LGBTQI+ communities, persons with disabilities or with limited literacy, persons from indigenous or marginalised groups, and others.
1.6 Support access to justice: We will support a survivor’s right to exercise their rights (or not), such as to an effective remedy, truth, access to ‘justice’ (however defined by the survivor) and transformative reparations. We will not negatively impact a survivor’s own priorities, ability to advance or claim rights, or choice to participate (or not) in accountability processes. Although records or reports of interviews may benefit survivors in later processes, we will mitigate the significant risk that prior interview methodology and records can also be used to argue that the survivor’s account is inconsistent or have been unduly influenced.
1.7 Respect self-identity: We will respect and reflect a survivor’s choice and expression of identity (such as gender, pronouns, disabilities and other characteristics) and avoid labels or characterisations which offend, sensationalise, marginalise, stigmatise, endanger or are otherwise harmful.
1.8 Be inclusive and do not discriminate: We will not engage in or tolerate any form of discrimination including by those who support our work. We will seek to include and make reasonable accommodation for those who are often excluded or silenced due to persecution, marginalisation, presumed lack of agency or capacity, or being overlooked as victims.





Tags: #yazidisinfo   #newsyazidis   #aboutyazidis   #humanrights   #yazidisiraq  



The Murad Code - as a panacea for informational and humanitarian ignorance

2022/05/7777-1652859357.jpg
Read: 413     12:30     18 Май 2022    

Foreword

It is a voluntary Code of Conduct that sets out the existing minimum standards for the safe, effective and ethical collection and use of information about victims or victims of systematic and conflict-related sexual violence. It concerns those who document, investigate, report, investigate, monitor, and otherwise collect and use such information.
The Code is based on international law, including the basic rights of survivors, such as the right to dignity, privacy, health, safety, access to justice, truth, and effective remedies. Thus, the Code reflects universal, non-negotiable core standards that should be applied by all participants in all contexts to support a victim-centered approach. The Code embodies standards applicable to individuals and organizations that must implement these standards into systems.
The "Murad Code" should be applied, for example, by human rights investigators, documentaries, observers and activists, criminal investigators; other officials and experts who collect, request, or receive SCRSV information, including immigration officers, as well as forensic experts; journalists; researchers; translators; and There are also public support organizations, survivor groups and humanitarian workers who collect, distribute, or publish such information. It should also be applied by those who appoint, manage, finance, and otherwise support or facilitate such collection and use of information, including policy makers.
The current focus of the Code on SCRSV stems from the origins of the initiative to identify and refine SCRSV standards and some factors specific to sexual violence, such as societal attitudes and stigmatization, which further harm survivors of violence. However, many of the Code's standards are equally applicable to the collection and use of information from survivors of other crimes and human rights violations.
We also need to consider in our work a wide range of other survivors, such as people with disabilities, persons from LGBT+ communities.
The Code emphasizes the need to recognize the identity of survivors and avoid assumptions based on the groups to which they belong or on any aspect of their personality. For example, "children" are not a homogeneous group and include people who are very different in age, maturity, resilience, education, gender, other identities, and situations.

Principle 1. Understand survivors as individuals

1.1 Adapt to survivor’s individuality: We respect that each survivor is unique. We will tailor our approach to their specific identities, characteristics, groups, and contexts, such as their age, gender, evolving capacities, resilience, relationships with and connections to others, socio-economic and political situation, and the discrimination they face. We recognize that such elements change over time and context and that our approach may have to be adjusted accordingly.
1.2 Counter assumptions: We will not make assumptions or generalizations about survivors or their experiences, such as how they ‘should’ behave or react, their vulnerability, trauma, resilience, gender, disabilities, capacity, maturity, reliability, needs or concerns.
1.3 Ask the survivor: Following initial preparation work, we will ask the survivor, including child survivors, about what they want, their priorities, concerns, risks and current situation. We will respect and reflect these to the extent possible within our mandates and resources.
1.4 Prioritise survivor safety: We will continuously prioritise a survivor’s safety, well-being and dignity ahead of our objectives. We will work to understand the risks and repercussions to survivors and those around them which could arise from any contact with us. Such risks can include revictimisation, reprisals, stigmatisation, physical, online, information and communications safety risks, and legal risks.
1.5 Identify heightened risks: We will take additional, specific precautions when there are heightened risks of further harm. We recognise that any individual may face heightened risks which may change over time and context. Heightened risks may arise for child survivors including children born of war and unaccompanied children, persons from LGBTQI+ communities, persons with disabilities or with limited literacy, persons from indigenous or marginalised groups, and others.
1.6 Support access to justice: We will support a survivor’s right to exercise their rights (or not), such as to an effective remedy, truth, access to ‘justice’ (however defined by the survivor) and transformative reparations. We will not negatively impact a survivor’s own priorities, ability to advance or claim rights, or choice to participate (or not) in accountability processes. Although records or reports of interviews may benefit survivors in later processes, we will mitigate the significant risk that prior interview methodology and records can also be used to argue that the survivor’s account is inconsistent or have been unduly influenced.
1.7 Respect self-identity: We will respect and reflect a survivor’s choice and expression of identity (such as gender, pronouns, disabilities and other characteristics) and avoid labels or characterisations which offend, sensationalise, marginalise, stigmatise, endanger or are otherwise harmful.
1.8 Be inclusive and do not discriminate: We will not engage in or tolerate any form of discrimination including by those who support our work. We will seek to include and make reasonable accommodation for those who are often excluded or silenced due to persecution, marginalisation, presumed lack of agency or capacity, or being overlooked as victims.





Tags: #yazidisinfo   #newsyazidis   #aboutyazidis   #humanrights   #yazidisiraq